Amsterdam Antics

The fall of 2016 was rather idyllic. I was in Europe, I was teaching full time though as any online teacher knows, that took about a month and a half to get up to 36-40 hours a week with VIPKid.

I’d gone back to DC in December 2016, having been teaching full-time for about three months. The hours in Europe were wonderful. I taught in Greece, in Holland, and in Denmark. Denmark was to be the only place that I canceled VIPKid classes because I was on vacation. My sister was pregnant at the time, and I had scheduled an hour and a half of teaching each day, for the week that we were in Denmark. In hindsight, I probably should’ve thought that through a little bit better because at that time there Was a seven-hour minimum of classes a week. I should’ve done the 7 1/2 hours altogether in one day. Alas, I learned my lesson. And thankfully, every other time that I canceled classes, it was circumstances beyond my control. As I mentioned in my last post, you have to be very careful when you cancel.

I generally enjoy the holiday season, and that Christmas season of 2016 would have been no exception. Except that I was waking up at 3 o’clock in the morning to teach To teach from four until 10. That was Monday through Thursday. On Friday and Saturday evenings I also taught from 8 PM until midnight. That schedule was grueling. For the VIPKid teachers who read my blog, you all know what I’m talking about. And for those of you, who live on the West Coast, it’s even worse. It was arguably the hardest thing I ever did besides my Celta. By February that year, I was done. I booked my ticket to come to Amsterdam one day, when I was in a really cranky mood, after having taught for six hours in the morning and three hours in the evening. I am not the world’s best sleeper by any stretch of the imagination and if you yourself are an insomniac of any stripe, this resonates with you as well.

I will admit that in preparing to move to Amsterdam I took the easy way out. The hours here in Amsterdam are 9 AM to 3 PM in the winter and 10 PM to 4 PM in the summer. Well at least, those are the hours that I am willing to work. I know there are other people who still wake up well before the ass crack of dawn To teach. More power to them. And I sold a couple pieces of furniture to pay for my move into a storage unit that we already had. They are my beautiful things sit until such time as I wish to claim them again. Or take the step of moving them internationally. As you may imagine that internal dialogue has been going on for the last year and a bit.

My first five weeks in Amsterdam were spent living with Jasper. But we had agreed that I would get my own place when I moved to Amsterdam. And my adopted city is a very fun town. There is always something to do. Dutch culture is very much about the outdoors. They ride their bikes everywhere. And unlike in the US, where cycling is tricked out with helmets, Lycra, and spandex, I[in Amsterdam it’s just a mode of transportation. I have seen all manner of strange things on a bike: from someone transporting something from IKEA, to a six-month-old in a car seat contraption strapped to handlebars. My favorite was the woman who was kitted out in elbow length gloves, a floor-length gown, and heels, going to the beautiful Concertgebouw, her violin strapped to her back, on her way to work. The Dutch have picnicking down to a science. They do it on their bikes. They take everything they need on those bikes. That includes not only the food and drink but also sometimes, the charcoal grill.

The Dutch will tell you that for good food, you have to go to Belgium. I will, of course, agree to disagree with them. I haven’t had terrible experiences with food. I am a cheese fiend. I’ve come to the right country. I set myself up once I got here, in a routine that would keep me teaching for a significant amount of time. But my afternoons were spent wandering the city, because if you’ve been staring at your computer for six hours, you are ready to get out of the house. These are just a few of my observations, as I wandered the city almost ceaselessly, every afternoon.

Those first five weeks were an idyllic time in many ways. But things were going to get even better. Want to find out how? That’s up next.

That’s all she wrote for this Inkreadable installment. Stay tuned, as always, there is more to come.

Voracious VIPKid

I completed the CELTA in mid-August 2016. The next task was, of course, to find a job. At the end of the course, I was exhausted and looking to get away from the DC summer. Accordingly, I bought my ticket to Greece on the last day of the course, IN the class, earning me the award “most likely to travel spontaneously”. It’s not a bad honorable mention. I left the US in mid-September. I was also heading to Amsterdam to see Jasper, and my return ticket to the US was not until just before December.

I have always been an entrepreneurial sort of spirit, and I did what every enterprising person who wants some extra cash does in the emerging gig economy of the 2010’s. I posted my extra room on Airbnb that year. It was a great success and I met some amazing people that I am still friends with today. I had about 200 people stay with me from January to September. A couple from Beijing stayed with me after my CELTA course was done and they told me about an ELT company that was taking China by storm. VIPKid was its name and edutainment was its game.

I wasn’t sure about the edutainment aspect of teaching, and the jury’s still out. I had wanted to teach in a classroom environment to adults initially. But then I considered the possibilities with teaching online. Online allowed me to be anywhere in the world with stable internet. I was a little concerned with the entertainment side of teaching kids as I am a natural introvert but thought that I’d be able to be a little entertaining. So I took the plunge and applied. I did two mock lessons and got hired. I started teaching in October 2016. I left for Greece shortly after being hired and I opened my schedule to classes as soon as I got there. In those bygone days of 2016, you had to open a minimum of 7 hours a week and wear an ugly orange shirt. Luckily the minimums are a thing of the past and thankfully so is the orange shirt. Though I will say that on the days that I didn’t feel like figuring out what to wear, the orange shirt as ugly as it was, came in handy.  But woe unto you if you dare to get sick at VIPKid because their cancellation policy is on the draconian side, though that too has loosened up a bit. You could get six cancellations in a 6-month contract period, so you had, and still have, to be super careful. I went to Denmark and set a stupid hour and a half a day teaching schedule. I used a few cancellations for that. Then I got more careful and the only other times I canceled were because of tech issues I couldn’t control, like when my dad’s internet died while I was staying there, and when I accidentally spilled liquid on my Mac while teaching in August 2017.

I discovered that I am a pretty good edutainer, but I am a better teacher for the older kids who have language than the younger ones. There are of course exceptions to that, like two of my students who are beginners who make my week when I see them. I am in touch with a few parents via WeChat, a Chinese chat app, and one mom has told me that I am the teacher that gets her soft-spoken, rather shy kid to talk. I used to have to prep a lot for each class, but now can literally do them in my sleep.

In my last post, I talked about the insane hours that I was waking up to keep my head above water during the CELTA. Once the idyllic vacation in Europe was over in the winter of 2016, I started thinking about working a 36 hour week in the US. You are likely rolling your eyes at that if you are a teacher at a brick and mortar school. But those were teaching hours, as in on camera, with the student teaching hours. That didn’t include any prep time. And did I mention my workday started at 3 am in the winter and 4 am in the summer? And so it was that in the winter of 2016 while everyone was snug in their beds while sugarplums danced in their heads, I was teaching Baobao (it means very clever in Chinese) his ABC’s and learning how to hide my yawns in the absence of coffee.

Needless to say, it wasn’t long before I started thinking about the glorious European hours and how to get back there. That story’s up next.

That’s all she wrote for this Inkreadable installment. Stay tuned, as always, there is more to come.